Tax Tips to Consider as 2017 comes to an end



December is an excellent time to consider year-end tax planning moves to save taxes for 2017. Once tax season gets underway in Q1 2018, it’s too late for these smart ideas.

Casualty loss deductions

The tax reform framework repeals the casualty loss itemized deduction for 2018, so try to complete your claims to support a 2017 tax deduction. The 2017 disaster tax relief bill for Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria victims exempts qualified disaster-related personal casualty losses from the 10% AGI threshold. Victims don’t have to itemize; they can add this casualty loss to their standard deduction, and that part is deductible for AMT.

Accelerate state and local tax deductions

The current tax reform framework repeals itemized deductions for state and local taxes including income, real estate, property and sales and use taxes. States without an individual income tax, including Texas, Florida, and Washington, have real estate and sales and use taxes. For 2017, you can elect to claim sales and use taxes as an itemized deduction instead of state income taxes. If you are thinking about buying an expensive item that is subject to sales and use tax, consider purchasing it before year-end. Accountants are looking into ways for a business to treat some state and local taxes as a business expense.

The tax reform framework repeals state and local tax deductions and AMT starting in 2018 so your best chance at a deduction might be to pay state and local taxes due by Dec. 31, 2017. This is a change from previous tax years when individuals may have postponed state and local taxes to avoid AMT. Be sure to check the latest developments on tax reform before you make this decision close to Dec. 31 since there is blowback on the repeal of state and local taxes, and I expect there could be changes.

Tax Loss Selling

A taxpayer with capital gains can reduce taxes by selling losing securities positions, realizing capital losses, before year-end. This continues to be a smart strategy in 2017, however, if you already have a $3,000 capital loss limitation, tax loss selling won’t help.

Arrange required minimum distributions

Take RMDs from traditional IRA, Solo 401(k) plan, and employer retirement plans. Commence RMDs by April 1 of the year following the calendar year in which you reach age 70½. Per IRS.gov, “If you do not take any distributions, or if the distributions are not large enough, you may have to pay a 50% excise tax on the amount not distributed as required.”

Maximize charitable contributions

You should make tax-deductible donations before year-end by check and credit card. Property donations of clothing, household goods, and appreciated securities can also be deducted. The itemized deduction is calculated based on fair market value (FMV), or another acceptable method. The FMV of clothing and household goods is usually a small fraction of the purchase price. When you deduct the FMV of appreciated securities, you avoid capital gains taxes. For charitable donations over $250, the IRS requires a written acknowledgment letter. Expect a reduction of the contribution amount based on the value of goods and services you receive, for example at a charity dinner.

The IRS permits individuals age 70½ or older to make charitable gifts up to $100,000 per person, per year, directly from their IRAs, and this generates several tax benefits. The strategy is more tax efficient than taking an income distribution and potentially losing some of the deduction with the Pease itemized deduction limitation for upper-income taxpayers or using the standard deduction. Avoiding an IRA withdrawal lowers AGI, which may unlock middle-income deductions and credits and avert net investment tax (NIT). The charitable donation amount also counts toward meeting the required minimum distribution (RMD) rule. You may not receive goods and services in connection with this donation from the IRA.

These are just a few ideas that should be considered. For a free no obligation

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